Purpose of this Document
 
This document provides a strategic overview of the Kent Police and Crime Commissioner’s (PCC) commissioning intentions for the financial year 2020/21. Commissioning can be impacted by a number of variables, including emerging trends and increasing demands, which may result in revisions to commissioning approaches. Therefore, this document should be treated as a guide which may be varied and updated throughout the 12-month period.
 
The aim is to also provide a detailed Commissioning Strategy which sets out the principles that the PCC adopts when commissioning services, the commissioning budget available and details of the specific funding streams available.
 
Commissioning Management Process 
 
Learning from 2019/20 will be reviewed and used to inform any changes or refinements to how commissioning arrangements are managed. At a high level the following learning areas have been identified:
 
• A review of the grant terms and conditions to ensure all services or projects funded operate to a minimum set of business standards.
• Ensuring that there is a clear complaint and escalation process where concerns are identified with a PCC commissioned service.
• The implementation of a mid-year monitoring point for the Crime Reduction Grant.
• Development of an audit programme which enables the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner (OPCC) to check adherence to the grant terms and conditions.
• Inclusion of specific requirements related to schools interventions and inputs.
• Enhanced sharing of the outcomes by services and projects funded by the PCC, with the aim of supporting increased collaboration.
 
Overview of 2020/21 Funding Streams 
 
1. Crime Reduction Grant 
 
The Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011 enables PCCs to issue grants to support crime and disorder reduction within their police area. The Crime Reduction Grant (CRG) will continue to be provided to Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs) and organisations such as the Drug and Alcohol Action Teams in 2020/21.
 
The high-level details of the CRG are as follows,
 
1.1 Community Safety Partnerships (CSPs)
• Receive the same grant award as 2019/20.
• There will be a continued focus on delivering projects aligned to violence reduction and projects that have a clear evidence base to reducing crime and anti-social behaviour. 
• A business case must be submitted prior to the start of the financial year, which must include outcomes to be achieved and evidence of need. Spend will be approved by the PCC prior to the funding being released.
• A third of the overall grant can be allocated to a tactical pot to deliver responsive projects, which address an evidenced need. The PCC will approve spend on these projects on submission of a business case.
• Monitoring of the projects funded will be required at the mid-point and at the end of the financial year.
• The PCC reserves the right that if, on review of the business cases or tactical pot projects, it is identified there is an overlap across multiple CSP areas or the same providers are being funded to deliver similar projects that funding maybe retained by the OPCC. The PCC may then fund the project or provider directly to ensure consistency of approach and value for money.
 
1.2 Third Parties (Youth Offending, Drug & Alcohol Action Teams etc.)
• Receive the same grant award as 2019/20.
• A review will potentially be undertaken during 2020/21 on whether there are opportunities to strengthen the requirements for how the funding is utilised. The aim is to ensure that the grant is targeting areas of need that specifically support the priorities of the PCC and the delivery of policing.
• There will be a focus on delivering projects aligned to violence reduction and projects that have a clear evidence base to reducing crime and anti-social behaviour.
• A business case must be submitted prior to the start of the financial year, which must include outcomes to be achieved and evidence of need. Spend will be approved by the PCC prior to the funding being released.
• Monitoring of the projects funded will be required at the end of the financial year but ad hoc reporting may also be requested.
• It is proposed that there will be greater scrutiny on delivery and spend.
 
1.3 Other Projects Funded
• National Ugly Mugs (NUM) - an organisation which aims to end violence against sex workers.
 
2. Mental Health and Policing Fund (MHP)
 
The MHP will not continue in 2020/21 and recipients were informed of this intention when the 2019/20 grant award was made. Engagement is being undertaken with the recipients to understand their sustainability plans for the projects.
 
3. Victim Specialist Services Fund (VSS)
 
The current recipients of the VSS will be asked to submit a business case in early 2020 detailing the continued need for the project funded. The business case will require evidence of need and outcomes achieved through the 2019/20 funding to be provided. The submissions will then be evaluated and those that are successful will be awarded funding for a six month period. This is due to the PCC elections in May 2020. Decisions on the extension of the grant for a further six months or a re-application process will be made once the outcome of the elections are known. 
 
The VSS criteria is:
• Meet the support needs of victims or, as appropriate, family members and act in their interests;
• Be free of charge and confidential;
• Be non-discriminatory (including being available to all regardless of residence status, nationality or citizenship);
• Be available whether or not a crime has been reported to the police;
• Be available before, during and for an appropriate time after any investigation or criminal proceedings;
• Demonstrate collaborative working with other providers to ensure joined up service delivery and referral pathways;
• Demonstrate innovative and evidence based working practices;
• Show an understanding and ability to respond to emerging trends, crime types and new working practices; and
• Deliver clear outcome reporting.
 
Payment of the grant will be made in one instalment, with a requirement to submit monitoring at the end of the grant award period.
 
3.1 Other Victim Services Funding
• Brake (the road safety charity)
• Domestic Homicide Reviews
• Kent County Council Integrated Domestic Abuse Service
• Kent and Medway Domestic Abuse and Sexual Violence Co-ordinator
• Modern Slavery Safe House
 
4. Violence Reduction Challenge (VRC)
 
4.1 Violence Reduction Fund (VRF)
The VRF is a three year fund, which opened to statutory organisations, community and voluntary groups, charities and social enterprises in April 2019. The VRF was available for a maximum of £35,000 per year for each of the three years of the fund, with the provision of funding being subject to the submission of satisfactory monitoring.
 
Bids were required to demonstrate how they would address the four themes of the PCCs VRC:
• Prevention
• Engagement / Education
• Enforcement
• Rehabilitation
 
Recipients of the VRF will be asked to submit a business case in early 2020 detailing the continued need for the project funded and outcomes achieved through the 2019/20 funding. This will support the decision to provide on-going funding and the requirement to provide satisfactory monitoring.
 
4.2 Violence Reduction Units (VRU) The PCC was awarded additional funding from the Home Office in 2019 to set up a Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) across Kent and Medway and it has been confirmed the same level of funding has been awarded for 2020/21.
 
The VRU is a partnership between Kent Police, local councils, health service providers and other key agencies to deliver a reduction in violence. However, the PCC has overall responsibility for the VRU and maintains strategic oversight of delivery. This includes oversight of any commissioning activity undertaken to ensure that appropriate processes and governance are in place. In addition, the OPCC will ensure that services commissioned by the VRU are complementary to existing provision and that collaborative opportunities are identified.
 
4.3 Other Violence Reduction Projects
• St Giles Trust - County Lines Project
• DA Perpetrator Programme Pilot 
 
5. Preventative & Engagement Projects
 
5.1 Amelix ‘Is it worth it’ School Tours  One year grant from 1 October 2020 to 30 September 2021 to deliver the ‘Is it worth it?’ tour for 25 days per academic year, in three blocks of delivery between November and July.
 
5.2 Volunteer Youth Cadets  The Volunteer Police Cadets programme provides an opportunity for young people aged 13-17 to get involved in activities which support community policing and learn about responsible citizenship.
  
6. Commissioned Services
 
6.1 Core Victim Referral and Support Service – Victim Support This contract on 1 April 2016 and is a three-year contract with the option to extend for a further three years on a yearly basis. A one year extension has been granted from 1 April 2020. 
 
Additional Services Delivered and Developing
• Countywide Stalking Advocacy Service
• Hate Crime Advocate
 
6.2 Restorative Justice Service – Restorative Solutions
This contract is a three year contract, with the option to extend for a further three years on a yearly basis. A one year extension has been provided from 1 October 2020. 
 
6.3 Independent Sexual Violence Adviser & Sexual Violence Support Service – Family Matters This contract commenced on 1 April 2019 for three years, with the option to extend for a further three years on a yearly basis. A decision on offering one year extension to be taken in autumn 2021.
 
7. Funding Opportunities 
 
The OPCC will pro-actively seek opportunities to secure additional funding to deliver services or projects that support the PCC’s priorities. This will include horizon scanning for central government funding opportunities during 2020/21 and consideration for developing joint bids with other partners.
 
7.1 Funding Streams Currently Identified
• Safer Streets Fund
• Additional ISVA Funding
 
8. Building Capacity and Capability
 
To support quality service delivery, improved funding applications and outcome reporting the OPCC will consider options to support capacity and capability with providers during 2020/21. Investment in this area may also support funding being secured from other sources to deliver which will increase the availability of services.